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Posts Tagged ‘figurative painter’

“I Have Dreams Where I Can Breathe Under Water” ~ Interview with Figurative Painter, Teresa Elliott

“There’s something irreverent about getting muddy. Plus, its related to play and recreation. My mother was OCD about keeping the floors clean, her hair in place. This is all counter to my mud series, which by the way is not appreciated by my parents. They have a visceral reaction to my mud paintings. That’s one advantage to being a mature artist, though, there’s no time to waste and I do what I want, but they remain scandalized.”

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To Paint That Eternal Music: Interview with Sol Halabi, Argentina

“I enter my paintings as if I am wandering through dreams, recognizing people, places and things, and yet the situations are of such strangeness and intensity that my mind must work to try to interpret and decode what I see. It is in that process where I find the value of my work: not what you see, but what is not. What generates my work internally, and when the painting is done, what it represents to the viewer.”

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Marwa Alnajjar, Amman, Jordan: “We defend our artworks with our fists and our crazy courage”

Countries in the Middle East vary a lot. for instance, there is a great difference between Dubai and Afghanistan, but professional women are oppressed all over the world in many ways. I myself have faced a lot of obstacles being a woman artist, yet I knew that women can do everything men could do. The more men have told me, “you can’t do that,” the more I had to prove them wrong. I had to hold it up for all women who looked up to me to be brave and courageous. We defend our artworks with our fists and our crazy courage. When you have guys that disrespect you, you’re gonna have to teach them a lesson, otherwise they are going to keep walking all over you. I’m sorry, but that’s the way it is out there; it’s not easy. But this also reflects views of the art world in general.

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Remember the Red: Reflections on My Father’s Work, by Bork Nerdrum

The red twilight, the turning point, is manifested in the female figure, plunged to the ground by three men – who represent the night. The child symbolizes the vulnerable remaining rays of the sunlight. The moon, which represents the illumination in Heraclit’s model, lights the way through the darkness and reappears as the lantern brandished by one of the soldiers.

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Aleah Chapin, Figurative Painter, New York City

One of the gifts of Aleah Chapin’s body-of-work is the idea that true intimacy is achieved first and foremost by revealing oneself honestly. That through vulnerability we are able to deeply connect. One’s imperfections can actually make connection with others deeper, stronger. More real.

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