24th Aug 2013

The Stories We Tell And The Ones We Don’t

I write selfishly. I comfort myself with my own words so that I don’t have to wait for someone else to ask me how I am feeling or what I am thinking. I don’t write so that after I am gone, people will remember me. I write so that I can remember me while I’m still here.

27th Jul 2013

Is Writing Poetry Akin to Taking a Shamanic Journey? Interview with Ruth L. Schwartz, Ph.D.

"After having personally practiced shamanism, shamanic healing, and shamanic journeying for more than half a century, I can say that there is nothing I have encountered in reports of the spiritual experiences of saints, prophets, psychedelic drug experimenters, near death survivors, avatars and other mystics that is not commonly experienced when following classic journey methods using a drum." —Michael Harner, The Foundation for Shamnic Studies

20th Jul 2013
lauren berry

Lauren Berry: The Lifting Dress

As award-winning poet Lauren Berry takes us through the after-effects of the sexual trauma experienced by her young narrator, the reader is chilled by the depth of the girl's vulnerability. But then there is another layer which the author weaves in with equally potency: the growing sense that here is a girl who, despite everything, remains the narrator of her own self-identity. Colorful and eccentric and steeped in lush, figurative language, this story, however difficult, is unmistakably her own.

19th Jul 2013
Christi Krug

When You’re Stuck in the Middle of the Muddy Muddy Puddle

When it comes to learning how to tune down the inner critic, the affects can be far-reaching: Not only can you free yourself up to be more spontaneous and adventurous with the project you're working on, but, as Krug points out, the benefits can often extend to other areas of your life as well.

03rd Jul 2013
Heidi Durrow

Novelist Heidi Durrow: The Girl Who Fell From the Sky

I think all of us in some way or another are unknown to ourselves. We know parts of who we are but there as other aspects of ourselves that are constantly still being revealed. The book is about how events and people in our lives help create us and make us the story of who we are.

15th Jun 2013
John Stanazzi

Let Me Tell You About My Father…

I invited some of the special people I know ~ from poets whose work has appeared in Combustus magazine to a dancer friend of mine who immigrated from Hungary ~ to share with us some of the wisdom they’ve received over the years from their fathers as well as what has been passed on to their own children.

15th Jun 2013

A Poet Talks About Fatherhood

It happened quite naturally. I liked to quote lines of poetry for them. Once when we were visiting the Atlantic coast and watching the waves crash and the sea spray spouting up, I quoted a favorite line from Hart Crane's poem, "The Dance": “what laughing chains the waters wove and threw.” My children never forgot that. Several years later when looking at another wild body of water, they would remind me of that same line.

13th Jun 2013

Hal Sirowitz, poet: You Can Thank His Dad for That Dry Wit

"I do think Americans take themselves too seriously. Just turn on the TV and count how many programs are contests – cooking, sports, singing and dancing, finding a house, a spouse. I suggest that once a year the major networks televise a sports game where both sides don’t keep score. Or broadcast a cooking show where the cooks make one big meal instead of competing against themselves to see who can make the better individual meal."

07th Jun 2013

The Lies We’re Told, The Lies We Tell Ourselves, and the Hopeful Truth

"If only I had parented differently, if only I had been a better child, if only I had been more desirable, then the addict would never have chosen their addiction over me. The truth is that addiction is a complicated process that no other person can be responsible for, only the addict. To believe otherwise is at the heart of codependency." ~Andrew Nargolwala, psychotherapist

13th May 2013
Jonna Ivin

Writer Jonna Ivin talks about hitting bottom, then finding her way back

"I was always watching my mother for signs of what mood she was in, so I became a very quiet child. You develop a good ear for dialog when you’re always monitoring what’s going on around you. You also get really good at hearing not only what’s been said, but also the undertones." ~Jonna Ivin, author of the ebook memoir, Will Love for Crumbs

04th May 2013
Deborah Stein profile

Deborah Jiang Stein, a Woman Born in Prison

"Children need their mothers. I feel lucky I lived a year with my birth mother in prison. We bonded and I know this helped better prepare me for life. The down side, the trauma of our separation, after that year together, took its toll. She had a long sentence ahead of her." ~writer, Deborah Jiang Stein

27th Apr 2013

“Find Yourself by Serving Others:” Interview with Sam Hamill

I think the burden we bear as artists is often a burden of privilege. We’ve “made it” to a place wherein we can search for art or discuss the meaning of being or search our own souls for the sweet sad music our angels make. Understanding how lucky we are to have the opportunity to make art of our speech, for whom shall we speak? The song of the self soon grows stale, while the songs of engagement bind us and poultice our wounds and open our hearts to the world. Chuang Tzu lived in a harsh cruel world and yet had the courage to dream he was a butterfly.

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