The Interior Life of the Observer: Interview with Figurative Painter Christina Sealey The Fertile Ground of New York City Oil Painter Martin Wittfooth Art As Therapy for the Unsatisfied Man: Interview with Argentine painter, Martin Llamedo Her Sweet Excess: Interview with American Painter Adrienne Stein “We Live Our Lives in Circles”: Interview with Mary Chiaramonte The Poetry of Synchronicity: Interview with Erin Anderson The Uber-Representational Paintings of John Brosio And The Stars Fell: Interview with artist Julyan Davis Intimacy With the Unseen: Interview with Figurative Painter Mia Bergeron Women Under Glass: The Paintings of Alyssa Monks

The Interior Life of the Observer: Interview with Figurative Painter Christina Sealey

“Throughout my life, I have often found myself in the position of the observer. It can be a comforting position with some feeling of security brought on by a fear of having to interact with other people. But, of course, this also creates a feeling of loneliness that pervades my work.”

The Fertile Ground of New York City Oil Painter Martin Wittfooth

“I’m exploring allegories of rebirth: the notion that we often have to let something die (metaphorically speaking) for something else to be allowed to be realized and flourish.”

Art As Therapy for the Unsatisfied Man: Interview with Argentine painter, Martin Llamedo

“Making a man happy, for more than a few seconds after consumption, is not very interesting to a consumer society; for them an unsatisfied man is preferable. Beauty and art, therefore, is fundamental therapy today.”

Her Sweet Excess: Interview with American Painter Adrienne Stein

“My work is personal, containing symbols and codes for things that are taking place in my life or what I yearn for. The stakes are high, so when others disapprove of your work, they essentially disapprove of you. It is a great risk. The life of an artist is full of self-doubt and isolation. Yet this is a part of everyone’s experience.”

“We Live Our Lives in Circles”: Interview with Mary Chiaramonte

“I like to entertain the idea that we live the same lives over and over. This is the thought behind this painting: that we live our lives in these circles, and all of our time will be experienced again.”

The Poetry of Synchronicity: Interview with Erin Anderson

“I think synchronicities are most noticeable when we look backward. In the moment, our experiences can feel disjointed, especially when the unexpected happens. But when you stand from a higher vantage point looking backward, the individual pieces of your experience fit together with a poetic elegance that just feels right.”

The Uber-Representational Paintings of John Brosio

“I am, of course, not entirely sure of what is going on in these images because, were I too certain, I would have no need to attempt them. But the dissatisfaction, or ‘frustration,’ as you call it, is very much a necessary ingredient. Maybe even the only ingredient.”

And The Stars Fell: Interview with artist Julyan Davis

“She came each day to stand in front of the murder ballad paintings. She had grown up listening to all that music. ‘I just stand here,’ she told me, ‘And the paintings pull the marrow from my chest.’ ”

Intimacy With the Unseen: Interview with Figurative Painter Mia Bergeron

“I’m a deep believer in physical rituals as a way to understand our world. Painting is a way for me to understand my own life.”

Women Under Glass: The Paintings of Alyssa Monks

“I want to somehow express what it’s like to be in their skin. I believe this is what art can do at its best. Maybe this way we will feel less alone in the world, more compassionate to each other, work with, instead of against, one other.”

Igniting the global community through exploration of the arts

26th Apr 2014

Laura Krifka: Of Predator and Prey

"Ultimately, I think the paintings are about the push and pull of predator and prey, and the way we encompass those roles within ourselves. This relates to sex, but also religion and history. The ways we justify or do not justify our own agendas to the world and to ourselves."

26th Apr 2014

To Remain Astonished: Interview with Concert Pianist Antonio Pompa-Baldi

"There is nothing more astonishing, and rewarding, than to play through a work you've played hundreds of times, and all of a sudden discover a new hidden line..."

19th Apr 2014

Sam Roxas-Chua, Eugene, Oregon: “Poetry is a Raft”

"Poetry is a raft for me. A safe raft that allows me to go into great depth and explore all the scary stuff. To make sense of what happened. Because if I wasn't able to make sense of what happened, I would be mute."

12th Apr 2014

Down the Rabbit Hole with Symbolist Painter Gail Potocki

"In my paintings, the woman is often a stand-in for all of humanity. I use the seduction of feminine beauty to act as a sort of 'lure' to encourage viewers to look longer and more closely at the work. She leads the viewers in, presents them with the unfolding scenario and makes them her co-conspirators. Without this human element in the painting, I think it is easier for the viewer to remove him or herself from the situation."

12th Apr 2014

Something Lost, Something New: Interview with Painter Maya Kulenovic

"This is how history unfolds, after destruction some things are forever lost, and some can be rebuilt. The result is something new, founded on the lifeline of what was before."

16th Mar 2014

When Courage and Goodness are Synonymous: Interview with Classical Figurative Painter, Luke Hillestad

"It's when characters in a picture are overflowing with Dignity, when I feel empathy for them, and I can sense they feel that for each other. All of my favorite work seems to have an abundance of dignity, empathy, and fantasy. For me, Courage and Goodness are synonymous." It seems to me that if we meet our truth with goodness/bravery - the result is beauty...Comfort - protection - consolation - we definitely long for these. Irony - at least as a philosophical groundwork - seems a shortcut - with no real satisfaction

22nd Feb 2014

To Paint That Eternal Music: Interview with Sol Halabi, Argentina

"I enter my paintings as if I am wandering through dreams, recognizing people, places and things, and yet the situations are of such strangeness and intensity that my mind must work to try to interpret and decode what I see. It is in that process where I find the value of my work: not what you see, but what is not. What generates my work internally, and when the painting is done, what it represents to the viewer."

15th Feb 2014

Vangelis Rinas, Greece: “The artist is born to suffer from incurable romance. No matter how hard reality becomes, he always believes that his work may change the world.”

"Don’t forget that we are born of the same land as Ulysses, made for travels and adventures, captains and fighters and explorers at the same time. Even when events don’t provoke us, we provoke events to happen. The artist, from wherever he comes, is born much like Ulysses."